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Thread: Rosehip wine

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Knottingley West Yorkshire
    Posts
    14,408

    Default Rosehip wine

    Pick 2 to 3-1/2 pounds of rose hips per gallon of wine. The bottled wine must age at LEAST two years to mature to its potential. Young rose hip wine will be almost undrinkable.



    ROSE HIP WINE (1)


    3-1/2 pounds of rose hips
    2-2/3 lbs finely granulated sugar
    7-1/3 pts water
    1 tsp acid blend
    1/2 tsp pectic enzyme
    1 tsp yeast nutrient
    Montrachet wine yeast


    Put the water on to boil. Meanwhile, cut the stems and ends off the rose hips. Chop the hips coarsely, put in nylon straining bag, and tie bag closed. Put bag and sugar in primary. Pour boiling water over these and stir well to dissolce sugar. Cover primary and set aside to cool. When room temperature, add pectic enzyme, acid blend and yeast nutrient. Recover and set aside 12 hours. Add yeast. Stir twice daily for 8-9 days. Drain and squeeze bag to extract juice. Pour juice into secondary. Fit airlock and set in dark place for 6 weeks. Rack into sterilized secondary, top up and refit airlock. Return to dark place and rack again after 3 months, top up and refit airlock. Return to dark place for 3 months. If wine has not cleared, fine with gelatin, wait two weeks, and rack again. When clear, bottle. Age additional 18-24 months in dark place. [Adapted recipe from Steven A. Krause's Making Wines from the Wild]



    ROSE HIP WINE (2)


    2 pounds of rose hips
    2-1/2 lbs finely granulated sugar
    7-1/4 pts water
    1 tsp acid blend
    1/2 tsp pectic enzyme
    1 tsp yeast nutrient
    Montrachet wine yeast


    Put the water with sugar in it on to boil. Meanwhile, wash and inspect the rose hips for insects. Chop the hips coarsely in a blender or food chopper, put in nylon straining bag, and tie bag closed. Put bag in primary and pour boiling sugar-water over bag. Cover primary and set aside to cool. When room temperature, add pectic enzyme, acid blend and yeast nutrient. Recover and set aside 12 hours. Add yeast. Stir and squeeze the bag twice daily for 8-9 days. Drain and squeeze bag to extract juice. Pour juice into secondary. Fit airlock and set in dark place for 2 months. Rack into sterilized secondary, top up and refit airlock. Return to dark place and rack again after 4 months, top up and refit airlock. When clear, stabilize wine and sweeten to taste. Wait 10 days and rack into bottles. Age additional 18-24 months in dark place. [Adapted recipe from Terry Garey's The Joy of Home Winemaking]



    ROSE HIP WINE (3)


    1/2 lb dried rose hips
    2-1/2 lbs finely granulated sugar
    7-1/4 pts water
    1 tsp acid blend
    1/2 tsp pectic enzyme
    1 tsp yeast nutrient
    Montrachet wine yeast


    Crush the dried rose hips, rinse and soak in water overnight. Put sugar in water and set on stove to boil. Meanwhile, drain, put in nylon straining bag and tie closed. Put bag in primary and pour boiling sugar-water over bag. Cover primary and set aside to cool. When room temperature, add pectic enzyme, acid blend and yeast nutrient. Recover and set aside 12 hours. Add yeast. Stir and squeeze the bag twice daily for 8-10 days. Drain and squeeze bag to extract flavor. Pour liquid into secondary. Fit airlock and set in dark place for 2 months. Rack into sterilized secondary, top up and refit airlock. Return to dark place and rack again after additional 2 months, top up and refit airlock. When wine clears, stabilize wine and sweeten to taste. Wait 10 days and rack into bottles. Age additional two years in dark place. [Jack keller's own recipe]
    N.G.W.B.J.
    Member of 5 Towns Wine and Beer Makers Society (Yorkshire's newest)
    Wine, mead and beer maker

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Earth (mostly), head - clouds, feet - ground, taste buds - heaven
    Posts
    855

    Default

    Rosehip wine is one of my favourites to make - foraging - and the season is upon us in the near future. What i have made to date i have always enjoyed however my wine making is improving lots and quickly so last year's brew now tastes a bit like rocket fuel in comparison to other brews. Some of this is down to insufficient aging (i thought a yearish was enough but i'm now better informed thanks WAH), some is due to poor balance i suspect. So this year i aim to improve it markedly.

    I think i'll try the second recipe (less work with processing the hips and last years hips were coarsely blended with no clearing probs or bitter tastes). Should i aim for an OG of 1080-1090 as seems to be the norm?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    1,736

    Default

    Ahhhh.....
    I did wonder when these would be ready to forage...
    Thanks ms67

    I do really fancy making this this year, so will be getting out very early in the mornings to avoid the pesky pensioners
    Insecure people try to make you feel smaller.

    Confident people love to see you walk taller

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Lampeter Wales
    Posts
    76

    Default

    These recipies Vary from 2-3 n half lbs per galon.... thats quite a difference, I've picked about 6-7 lbs so far..... should I make 2 or three gallons what is the difference? I prefere to go for quality not quantity but if the diference is only slight then I will do 3 gallons

    this is the thing with starting off with country wines I've never tasted any of them

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