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Thread: Bottling and Corking

  1. #11
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    If you don't have a corker, or your prefer to use flanged corks, that's okay too.

    Spray each with sanitising solution, and press in the bottle.


    If you have a plunger-type corker, all I will suggest to you is: Get a new one. This is more trouble than it's worth, and the corks are never as nice as you want them to be.
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    Last edited by medpretzel; 26-11-2007 at 09:48 PM.
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  2. #12
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    Sometimes it happens that you have what I call "peekers"... The corks peek out of the bottle. The only real thing to do is to uncork the bottles and put in new ones.

    Yes, this also happens to experienced winemakers, so don't feel bad.
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  3. #13
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    If you are doing more than one demijohn of wine, don't forget to label the group of bottles you have.

    This may sound trite, and unimportant, but no, you will not remember which group is which in a week.

    So, I like to use my demijohn labels and just hang them around one of the bottles that is in the group.

    You should let the bottles stand upright for about a week or two so that no popping corks will spray wine all over your cellar. But if you properly degassed, this really shouldn't happen.
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  4. #14
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    So you think you're done?


    You are wrong! It's now time for clean-up. Just as important as anything else.

    Place your equipment in the sink. Here is where some winemakers might disagree. I use normal dishwashing detergent and make sure everything is very clean. I also make sure that all suds are rinsed clear.

    I use a demijohn brush to get some of the tougher stuff off.

    Make sure you sanitise and wipe off your surface with your towel.
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  5. #15
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    Just as a follow-up, I spray the sanitising solution 18 times (okay, I don't know why, but it's just my lucky number) into the demijohn. I put a stopper on the demijohn and it's good to go for the next use.



    I hope this tutorial helps, and if anyone has any input or comments, or even criticism, please let me know.
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  6. #16
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    Fantastic tutorial Danina many thanks
    regards
    bob
    N.G.W.B.J.
    Member of 5 Towns Wine and Beer Makers Society (Yorkshire's newest)
    Wine, mead and beer maker

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