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Thread: Floor corker strip/clean

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Knottingley West Yorkshire
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    14,442

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    Gave mine another clean today, as it was leaving a streak down the corks

    thanks again for a great tutorial Rich
    N.G.W.B.J.
    Member of 5 Towns Wine and Beer Makers Society (Yorkshire's newest)
    Wine, mead and beer maker

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Healing, Lincolnshire
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    2,357

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    The ebay corker I cleaned here was a bit passed it really, and needed new jaws. I got a new one from Duffbeer at Grapefest '09. This new one has done me well so far, but I've noticed it does need a clean, or at least some attention.

    I spray my corks with a 10% sulphite solution before corking. Not loads, but some. They then sit there, excess is shaken off before insertion. This leaves the corker slightly damp though, which then causes it to corrode under the jaws.

    So, should I modify my technique, or just fix corrosion?

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    British columbia Canada
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    2,188

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    Why use sulfite on your corks Rich? Corks come sanitized ready to use in the bag.
    http://www.winensuds.com/ Gotta love this hobby

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
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    Healing, Lincolnshire
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    Quote Originally Posted by rjb222 View Post
    Why use sulfite on your corks Rich? Corks come sanitized ready to use in the bag.
    Because the bags tend to be repackaged from the home brew shops into about 100 corks or so. Also, it's not always a fresh bag I'm opening. I've been meaning to make a cork humidor for a while following some info I got off here or winepress, just not really got round to it.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
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    Knottingley West Yorkshire
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    I have been thinking along these lines too Rich, and I have decided not to use sulphite solution on the corks just prior to use, but to store them in a corkodor (sp) a sealed plastic container that has within it a tub of sulphite solution so the air in there is full of sulphur fumes.

    should alleviate the problem i hope

    regards
    Bob
    N.G.W.B.J.
    Member of 5 Towns Wine and Beer Makers Society (Yorkshire's newest)
    Wine, mead and beer maker

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Peterborough
    Posts
    3,881

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    Share: IF you have an italian floor corker READ THIS.

    I have found that there seems to be an issue with one of the pins in Italian floor corkers and it needs extra lubrication.

    http://www.barossa-region.org/winema...nctioning.html

    This is just one (best?) ref I have for it, but it did seem very common topic on other forums.



    EDIT: (Bob) The link has potential spam in it if you click the highlighted words

    I have de spammed and copied the text here

    The following is a scenario I've seen on 2 separate Italian corkers: as the handle is brought down the side links start to push the jaws closed; just before the bent rod begins to move the cork down into the bottle, the jaws reverse and open up a bit. On a properly functioning corker this slight reverse movement does NOT occur.
    Rick and Joe, if this is what you are seeing I think I can tell you what the problem is. I've never used synthetics so I don't know if this behaviour is causing your creases. In my corkers, what it does is cause the leading lip of the cork to scrape against the hole in the corker as it goes into the bottle. This causes the lip of the cork to fold back or tear and results in an unacceptable closure. Here is the cause! It has to do with the lubrication of the handle "journal" bearing. This bearing is a simple steel cylinder welded onto the handle. The bearing normally rotates on a shaft (also mild steel) that is threaded on each end and retained in the sheet metal housing with 2 nuts. This is a "terrible" design, btw! When the lubrication of the journal on the shaft diminishes (only a matter of time) the journal will "freeze" on the shaft and the shaft will begin to turn in the housing when the handle is moved. The shaft holes in the thin sheet metal housing take no time at all to wear into an egg shape! The result of this is that the jaw forces when the cork is compressed push back through the links and move the shaft rearward! This allows the jaws to open slightly! Viola! Crappy closure!
    Last edited by lockwood1956; 05-03-2011 at 10:07 AM.
    Gluten free, caffeine free, dairy free, fat free you gotta love this red wine diet!

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Knottingley West Yorkshire
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    Cheers Brian

    good find, thanks for sharing

    regards
    Bob
    N.G.W.B.J.
    Member of 5 Towns Wine and Beer Makers Society (Yorkshire's newest)
    Wine, mead and beer maker

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