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  • Nettle wine

    Does anybody have a good nettle wine recipie? I was going to add some late to a wine number one, but wondered how much and whether they need boiling.

    Thank you kindly.

  • #2
    I have had a look through my collection of v old winemaking books and can find nothing (which surprizes me). Sorry
    Gluten free, caffeine free, dairy free, fat free you gotta love this red wine diet!

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    • #3
      There are 4 recipes on Jack Kellars website which may be of use,


      I've never tried them so can't pass an opinion though.

      Good luck,
      Kev

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      • #4
        Nettles ? Hum! well I've heard that they can be used, and also "Nettle beer". Yet for the life of me, I can't find any enthusiasm to try. After all, I spent too much time as a kid, rubbing my shins with "doc" leaves to try and alleviate the soreness from being stung by the damn things...
        Women will never be equal to men until they can walk down the street with a bald head and a beer gut, and still think they are sexy.

        Some blog ramblings

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        • #5
          Originally posted by fatbloke View Post
          Nettles ? Hum! well I've heard that they can be used, and also "Nettle beer". Yet for the life of me, I can't find any enthusiasm to try. After all, I spent too much time as a kid, rubbing my shins with "doc" leaves to try and alleviate the soreness from being stung by the damn things...
          Yep, I agree with you here! For the record, they are supposed to make a good wine, but are probably best used in beer. For one gallon of medium-strength wine use 4 pints of nettle tops (top 2"), picked when young and tender/ Infuse with sugar, grape juice concentrate, ginger and the juice and zest of 2 lemons. Ferment on the pulp for a week, then strain into a demijohn. You will need yeast nutrient as this is a leaf wine. I've seen Lyme Bay winery's nettle wine in the farm shop but I have never got around to trying it. I might buy one and see if it's worth the effort/pain!
          Brewing: Black Rock Cider, Milestone Olde Home Wrecker, port wines
          Conditioning: Oranje Bock Bier, about 30 demijohns of wine of various types
          Drinking: Steam Beer, Czech Pilsner, Dark Ale, lots of wine, Moonshine

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          • #6
            I've just looked through my books but only found one recipe (and it's not really a recipe). Ben Turner (1979), "nettles...have been used for thousands of years to flavour beers and wines. Use the tops of young plants. They are rich in minerals and vitamins, especially iron and vitamin C, and have a somewhat bitter taste. You may prefer nettle beer to nettle wine. Use 2 quart measures of nettle tops excluding tough stalks. Wash them in cold water and then boil gently for half an hour in 3 quarts of water. Leave to cool and then strain into the must".
            Hope this helps.
            Brewing: Black Rock Cider, Milestone Olde Home Wrecker, port wines
            Conditioning: Oranje Bock Bier, about 30 demijohns of wine of various types
            Drinking: Steam Beer, Czech Pilsner, Dark Ale, lots of wine, Moonshine

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by fatbloke View Post
              Nettles ? Hum! well I've heard that they can be used, and also "Nettle beer". Yet for the life of me, I can't find any enthusiasm to try. After all, I spent too much time as a kid, rubbing my shins with "doc" leaves to try and alleviate the soreness from being stung by the damn things...
              Ah, remember how much a nettle sting hurt when we were kids? I used to think my Father was super human because he could get stung and not collapse in agony. Sorry, went off on a remeniscence there, I'll be quoting Battle Comic next; is that a sign I'm getting old?
              Thank you all for your help, that's just what I need. I can understand the lack of enthusiasm for nettle wine/beer/soup, but I like the idea of something so traditionally useless, even harmful, being inverted; so to speak. That and I want to try out the hedgegrow wines, that smacks of proper country wine to me. I want to try nettle, dandelion, gorse and the elders. Also there isn't a nettle recipie on here, so if it comes out ok, I can post a recipie; that excites me a little more than it should.
              Anywhoo, I will keep thee posted. Now where is my Chopper and my Simon says game?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Leon View Post
                Now where is my Chopper and my Simon says game?
                Behind your space hopper, next to your space invader game!
                I know what you mean about making the nettle stuff. I might get around to it. I made Hawthorn blossom wine last year for the first time - I've just bottled it, and it seemed quite nice, though in need of a little more maturation. How about oak leaf wine too? Anyway, I'd be interested to hear your results.
                Brewing: Black Rock Cider, Milestone Olde Home Wrecker, port wines
                Conditioning: Oranje Bock Bier, about 30 demijohns of wine of various types
                Drinking: Steam Beer, Czech Pilsner, Dark Ale, lots of wine, Moonshine

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Emeraldclaire View Post
                  I made Hawthorn blossom wine last year for the first time - I've just bottled it, and it seemed quite nice, though in need of a little more maturation. How about oak leaf wine too?
                  Did it have a distinct taste that you could pin down as 'Hawthorn'? Oak leaf, good shout. I have added it to the list. I'm getting so country I have a blade of straw in my mouth and they call me Worzel. Is it a blade of straw?

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                  • #10
                    A lot of country wines were originally made to store the goodness of the plant - nettle for one has many health beneficial properties.

                    I want to try nettle, dandelion, gorse and the elders.
                    - CJJ did a book dedicated to elderberries and flowers - might be worth hunting it down.
                    Gluten free, caffeine free, dairy free, fat free you gotta love this red wine diet!

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                    • #11
                      T Edwin Belt did the Elderbrry and Elderflower book
                      see here

                      http://www.winesathome.co.uk/forum/s...ambucus-Nigra)

                      regards
                      Bob
                      N.G.W.B.J.
                      Member of 5 Towns Wine and Beer Makers Society (Yorkshire's newest)
                      Wine, mead and beer maker

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                      • #12
                        did he copy it off CJJ
                        Last edited by Cellar_Rat; 17-04-2012, 07:49 AM.
                        Gluten free, caffeine free, dairy free, fat free you gotta love this red wine diet!

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                        • #13
                          Blimey - well typed dude!!
                          Gluten free, caffeine free, dairy free, fat free you gotta love this red wine diet!

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                          • #14
                            Cheers Bob, Thats brilliant,

                            just waiting for the Elderberries now.

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                            • #15
                              The 2lb Elderberry and 2lb Blackberry per gallon recipe which is on the forum somewhere is very good if the one I tried at Grapefest is anything to go by.

                              I have started a couple of gallons of that and also used some of the recipes from Bill Smiths Award Winning Wines book that features elderberries as an ingredient.

                              Well worth getting hold of the book anyway in my opinion. It is a good read and very useful for trying to make wines using ingredients other than grapes.

                              Rob

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